The Story of the Four Ps

“One day, four brothers and sisters sat watching their favorite TV show. As they sat around the TV, a commercial came on playing the theme … ♪♬♩♪ Market-Os, Market-Os. Everybody loves Market-Os!  ♪♬♩♪

“After the commercial ended, each of the four little Ps was so excited to tell the others what they thought was the most important part of marketing.”

And so begins the story of the four Ps of marketing – product, price, place and promotion.

The Assignment

The 4 Ps of Marketing was written by Walton seniors Alexandra Bailey (marketing major), Sydney Carson (management major) and Victoria Slaby (marketing major).
The 4 Ps of Marketing was written by Walton seniors Alexandra Bailey (marketing major), Sydney Carson (management major) and Victoria Slaby (marketing major).

In clinical assistant professor Rebecca Miles’ marketing management class, students study marketing strategies and tactics from a management perspective. They delve into products, pricing, promotion and placement. They also discuss product life cycles, ethical practices and market research.

To highlight these concepts, Miles had student teams write and illustrate children’s short stories focusing on these marketing elements.

“The main objective was to get them engaged with marketing concepts in relaxed, fun way then have them write about something they know for a target market who is very different from them,” Miles said.

Projects explained on an elementary school level the ideas of market research, marketing strategies or marketing ethics.  In one such tale, “Molly Learns Marketing,” the main character – Molly – learns the six values marketing professionals embody: honesty, fairness, responsibility, trust, respect and citizenship.

As told by seniors Maddy Long, Julia Bianchi, Courtney Gray and Audrey Allen, the protagonist Molly learns these values through discussions with her mom, chores at home, expectations in the classroom, playing with friends, cleaning up the playground and taking care of her pets.

Woo Piggie Marketing Project by Savannah Nelson, Julie Pham, Quintin Ruiz and Lauren Abbott.
Woo Piggie Marketing Project by Savannah Nelson, Julie Pham, Quintin Ruiz and Lauren Abbott.

Several student teams wrote about lemonade stands to discuss product, pricing, placement and promotion. Other teams did it using chocolates, muffins sales or school parties.

To explore market research, the student team of Spencer Bone, Omero Rodriguez, Emily McAlister, Patrick Biggs and Roger Vang, demonstrated the concept through a young boy’s desire to become president of his fourth grade class. The main character, Cornelius, learned that he should gather information about the wants and needs of his class, such as extra recess time and pizza in the cafeteria, and then deliver those items.

Through simple story telling, students were able to describe and explain the basic strategies and tactics of marketing without using industry jargon or complex theories.

And with that in mind, every good story deserves a good ending.

“Finally Market Mom walks in and tells her four little Ps that product, place, price and promotion are equally important in marketing. They are all special in their own way, but they are stronger when they work together.”

The End

EPIC Spotlight: Qin Weng

Data. Businesses love it, and students want to learn all they can.

When Qin Weng taught business analytics last fall, she discovered that her classes consisted of students with a wide variety of majors who were eager to learn how to interpret data to get meaningful information. “Companies are looking for these skills to better utilize their data,” says Weng, who joined the Walton College as an information systems assistant professor last August.

And exploring data can be fun. In her classes, Weng asks her students to look at all kinds of topics that utilize data. They returned with a variety of ideas that included examining students’ drinking habits and their academic performances to predicting the winners of athletic events.

The discovery element keeps things interesting. “It’s like fishing for something you don’t know,” she says.

During her first semester at Walton, Weng taught Business Analytics and Visualization to undergraduates and Data Analytics Fundamentals to graduate students. She says her classes are tough by design, and she finds that when she challenges her students, they deliver. “It’s really mind-blowing at the end of the semester when they present their ideas,” she says.

Weng grew up in the Jiangsu Province in east China, north of Shanghai, and earned a degree in international business studies at Beijing Foreign Studies University. She became fascinated with software programs used for data analysis, such as Excel and SPSS. These programs enabled her to collect data and, more importantly, gain insightful findings.

She came to the United States to further her education and earned her master’s degree at Virginia Commonwealth University. Following graduation, Weng worked for an insurance company in various roles, including as a business analyst, serving as a liaison between business divisions and the technology department. She created applications that helped data flow more efficiently between the company and government agencies, such as Medicare and Medicaid. Weng also facilitated data-filled reports to help company managers in their decision-making.

In her several years working in the healthcare industry, she saw a continued divide between business and technology. She wanted to bridge those gaps. She also missed graduate school and research. Weng was accepted to the doctorate program at the University of Pittsburgh, where she had the opportunity to work on a large-scale, government-funded project to build digital infrastructure to enable transformative scientific research through the Global Environment for Networking Innovation (GENI). Through the project, she researched different topics, including the control methods in project management and the collaboration networks among project participants. Her research has been published in Information Systems Research.

Weng earned her Ph.D. and came to Walton, a place that captured her attention with the school’s scholars, whom she also found to be friendly. It’s a good fit. “This is one of the most amazing places I have ever been,” she says.

She also enjoys the Women of Walton gatherings, which made her feel proud to be among the female faculty at the college. She says she found Anne O’Leary-Kelly, organizer and Walton senior associate dean, to be caring in her mission to boost morale and build relationships among faculty and staff.

Weng is using that energy in her research as well as to inspire students.

“I hope my teaching can spark their interest in business analytics,” Weng says.

Parker Selected as Walton College Employee of the Quarter

2019 EOQ Q2 Autumn Parker
Dean Matt Waller recognizes Autumn Parker as Employee of the 2nd Quarter for Walton College.

Autumn Parker, director for undergraduate recruitment and enrollment management, has been named employee of the second quarter by the Sam M. Walton College of Business.

Anyone in the college may nominate colleagues for the award, which is given to employees who show superior customer service that enhances the image of the college above and beyond the scope of that employee’s job description.

Along with Parker, Carolyn Eiler, stewardship & events manager; Michael Gibbs, associate director of enterprise technology; and Christina LaChance, administrative specialist II in Undergraduate Programs, were also nominated for their contributions to Walton College.

The winner receives a certificate of appreciation and a cash prize. Winners are chosen by Walton College Dean Matt Waller, the associate deans, the assistant deans and the Walton College Staff Council.

Free Innovation and Entrepreneurship Workshops for Students, Faculty, Staff and Alumni

The McMillon Innovation Studio at the Sam M. Walton College of Business is joining forces with the Office of Entrepreneurship and Innovation to bring a series of workshops and services to university students, faculty, staff and alumni during the spring 2019 semester. The workshops and services focus on building skills needed for innovation, creative problem-solving and meaningful collaboration.

Free Workshops
This semester’s events include:

  • Creative Confidence – Participants learn how to strengthen team dynamics by applying art and theater principles like improvisation that build trust and agility. This 1-hour, interactive workshop is designed to:
    • Foster an open and collaborative environment.
    • Build creative confidence.
    • Facilitate an “agile” way of working.
    • Get people outside their comfort zone.

These workshops are deployed on an as-needed basis, typically at the start of a class with group projects. Email oei@uark.edu to schedule.

  • The Heart of the Customer – Deep empathy for the end user is a meaningful starting place for new innovations and businesses. Participants learn key techniques for empathizing and interacting with their audience – clients, users, patients or customers. This workshop helps participants:
    • Create an open mindset to change and iteration.
    • Understand empathy and why it is important.
    • Practice drawing key insights from an empathy map and customer discovery interviews.

Workshops will be held Feb. 20 from 5:45-7 p.m. at the Brewer Family Entrepreneurship Hub just off the Fayetteville square or on Feb. 26 from noon-1:30 p.m. at the McMillon Studio located in the Harmon Parking Garage on campus.

  • Prototype and Iterate – Workshop attendees learn how to create, release and test “minimum delightful experiences.” Participants will gain experience rapid prototyping in a safe environment. By the end of this hands-on workshop, participants will:
    • Understand the importance of failure.
    • Know how to use feedback loops to inform iterations.
    • Practice prototyping in the McMillon Studio makerspace (3D printing, digital tools, sewing, drawing, etc.).

Workshops will be held March 6 from 5-6:30 p.m. or on March 12 from 5-6:30 p.m. at the McMillon Studio.

  • Setting Your Idea Free – This workshop is intended for people who have a prototype or a solution and need to get funders, partners or customers onboard. Participants will learn key storytelling techniques in a low-risk, highly interactive speed-pitching session. Participants will:
    • Learn the essential parts of a good story.
    • Learn how to identify a target audience and tailor a message to that audience.
    • Practice telling their stories live.

Workshops will be held March 27 from 5:45-7 p.m. at the Brewer Hub, April 2 from noon-1:30 p.m. at the McMillon Studio, and on April 10 from 5-6:30 p.m. at the Brewer Hub.

  • Bootstrapping 101 – This workshop is intended for innovators who have validated an idea and need help getting it off the ground. Drawing from real-life case studies, this workshop will show how creatively pulling resources together can replace or supplement traditional financing. Attendees will:
    • Learn the principles of business viability (cost structure and revenue streams).
    • Learn how to identify and apply for grant funding.
    • Understand the value of interdisciplinary teams.

Workshop will be held April 3 from 5:45-7 p.m. at the Brewer Hub.

Additional entrepreneurial programs and services will also be available:

Speed Consulting – Individuals and teams working on a business or idea can bring their questions and get advice from a range of experienced consultants, in fields ranging from marketing to design to intellectual property, in one afternoon. Consultations will be held Feb. 20 from 2-4 p.m. at the Brewer Hub or on April 19 from 2- 4 p.m. at the McMillon Studio.

Speaker Series — Be inspired by intrapreneurs and entrepreneurs with a story to tell in an intimate, conversational setting.  Lectures are held April 17 and on May 1 from 5-6:30 p.m. at the McMillon Studio.

Faculty Bootcamp – Faculty interested in using innovation and entrepreneurship workshops in concert with their classes or programs can join this two-hour session for an overview of the content. Workshops will be held March 5 from noon-1:30 p.m. at the McMillon Studio and on March 6 from 4:30-6 p.m. at the Brewer Hub.

The Brewer Family Entrepreneurship Hub is located at 123 W. Mountain Street in Fayetteville. The McMillon Innovation Studio is located at 146 N. Harmon Avenue. 

All events require preregistration. To register for the workshops, visit oeiworkshops.eventbrite.com. For additional information, email mcmillon@walton.uark.edu or oei@uark.edu.

EPIC Alumni Spotlight: Lingyun Zhang

The enduring career of Lingyun Zhang is the confluence of life-long passions, influences and experiences, starting in China, moving to America, and then back overseas. Although she primarily focuses on marketing strategies in her graduate pursuits, Zhang also enjoyed the experience of earning a degree at the Sam M. Walton College of Business in supply chain management this past May.

“During my time as an undergraduate, when I learned the concepts and skills in supply chain management and other business-related courses like finance, accounting and marketing, I gradually realized that separated knowledge could contribute little help to being successful as an entrepreneur,” said Zhang. “Supply chain management helps a company save money while marketing skills help the company increase sales. I desire more comprehensive knowledge about how to run a company in the future.”

Before Zhang studied abroad, she earned her first Bachelor’s degree in logistics management at Soochow University which is based in Suzhou, China. Driven to succeed, Zhang was awarded the Academic Excellence Award prize three times alongside her other academic awards that highlighted her community involvement, innovation and quality development.

Zhang held two different positions at Soochow University during her enrollment, one as vice president for Enactus and the other as associate director for the Students’ Union. Her involvement with students, awards and scholarships she obtained pushed her to study abroad and pursue a degree in supply chain management, as she was granted the Soochow University Overseas Study Scholarship in 2017.

Lingyun Zhang, Walton College alumna“My academic experiences at the University of Arkansas had a profound impact on me, but the relationships I built with my instructors, classmates, and friends are absolutely the most invaluable things in my mind.”

In her free time, Zhang enjoys spending time outdoors, exploring with her friends and being with her family. Her mother and father both live in China, which influenced her returning home after her studies concluded at the University of Arkansas.

During her time in the Walton College, Zhang held a spot on the Chancellor and Dean’s List. In just one academic year, she and her classmates from Soochow accumulated 47 credits. Zhang was among the highest performing students in her class, obtaining a 4.0 grade point average throughout her experiences abroad.

 What Zhang has learned from her academic courses has proven invaluable during her internships, with Walmart China being her first in 2016. As a project intern in the Supply Chain Department, Zhang was responsible for the system upgrade of the Team Productivity Report for the Fresh Distribution Centre. Her responsibilities entailed eliminating inefficient jobs, redefining new roles and presupposing the criteria for working hours and work efficiency assessments.

Presently, Zhang resides as a digital marketing intern for Wyeth Nutrition based in Shanghai, where she directly communicates with multiple departments to support campaigns’ follow up and convenient operation.

Time management in her administrative work is a direct reflection of one of the many skills she acquired during her time at the Walton College. Continuously engaging in administrative work, Zhang still finds time to pursue her research interests, involving marketing strategies and analysis rooted in Chinese tradition and media.

Lingyun Zhang, Walton College alumna

“Enjoy your time in academia, even the quizzes and tests,” said Zhang. “I’ve learned that problems are not limited to answer selections; issues outside of school are much harder to solve and not always as clear-cut.”

We are proud to have Lingyun Zhang as one of our EPIC Spotlights as she continues to make global progress and encourages other women to do the same!

 — Blair Carver, SCMRC Communication Coordinator

Walton Career Services Prepares Students for Job Readiness

Walton Career Services at the Sam M. Walton College of Business hosts events year-round to prepare students for careers.  Activities and services include workshops with industry professionals, professional development skill enhancements and internship/job search strategies.

2016 Career Fair Walton College
Walton College students find leads for internships and full-time jobs at the Walton College Career Fair.

In addition to traditional career fairs, professional development sessions, informational sessions and interviews, this semester’s events will include weekly Are You Ready? pop-up shops, as well as its Company of the Day program. A summary of events is included below.

February Events:

  • RB Outperformance Challenge: Feb. 7, 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.
  • Sam’s Club Lunch & Learn: Feb. 11, 11:45 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.
  • Schneider Corporate Spotlight: Feb. 13, 8:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.
  • Sales Competition: Feb. 21
  • Resume Rescue: Feb. 26 & 27
  • Are You Ready? Pop-Up Shop: Every Tuesday, 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

March Events:

  • Business Career Fair: March 5, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. & 1 – 3 p.m.
  • Enterprise – Company of the Day: March 26, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.
  • Are You Ready? Pop-Up Shop: Every Tuesday, 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

April Events:

  • J.B. Hunt – Company of the Day: April 2, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. & 1 – 3 p.m. 
  • PepsiCo Distinguished Lecture: April 4, 3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
  • Buckle – Company of the Day: April 9, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. 
  • Careers in the Arts & Entertainment Industries: April 9, 3:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m. 
  • Academy Sports + Outdoors Corporate Spotlight: April 10, 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. 
  • UA Employer Partners BBQ: April 11
  • Abbott – Company of the Day: April 16, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.
  • SAM Talk with Buster Arnwine of RB: April 17, 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.
  • Are You Ready? Pop-Up Shop: Every Tuesday, 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

For more details, visit walton.uark.edu/career/, email CareerServices@Walton.uark.edu or sign into Handshake  uark.joinhandshake.com to see the complete list and newly added events. You can also register to attend at uark.joinhandshake.com.

2018 China Logistics Insights Report Released With Theme Focusing on Green Supply Chain

The Supply Chain Management Research Center at the Sam M. Walton College of Business at the University of Arkansas teamed up with researchers in China to compare the macro-economic data of Chinese and American transportation volume and inventory costs. The research was conducted by the Walton College center, the Development & Research Center of the State Post Bureau of the Chinese Ministry of Transportation and the Cainiao Smart Logistics Network Limited, an Alibaba affiliate.

2018 China Logistics Insights Report
2018 China Logistics Insights Report

The 2018 China Logistics Insights Report reviews each country’s detailed logistics costs as a percentage of gross domestic product. Findings compare the domestic Chinese economy with cost details in the U.S. State of Logistics Report, insights on the differences and logistics trends and an outlook for the future. This year’s report focuses on green supply chain. 

“China’s green supply chain strategy has been evolving for several years starting in 2011 in a development phase. It has matured to include product design, procurement, production, sales, distribution, consumption and recycling aspects of supply chain management.  Currently, green supply chain governance systems based on regulations, policies and standards are in place” said John Kent, clinical associate professor in the Department of Supply Chain Management.

To receive a digital copy of the report, email John Kent at JKent@walton.uark.edu along with your name and company affiliation.