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Board Accepting Nominations for the 2019 Arkansas Business Hall of Fame

The Arkansas Business Hall of Fame board is accepting nominations for the 2019 class of leaders who have made a lasting contribution to business and their communities.

Arkansas Business Hall of Fame

The nomination deadline is July 31.

Specific criteria for selection and a list of past honorees can be found at walton.uark.edu/abhf. Nominations can be made by completing and submitting the form found on the Arkansas Business Hall of Fame website or sending a letter of nomination including information that illustrates to the selection committee why the nominee deserves recognition.

Nominations also may be emailed to abhf@walton.uark.edu or by mail to the Office of External Relations at the Sam M. Walton College of Business, Donald W. Reynolds Center for Enterprise Development, Office of External Relations, Room 217, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701-1201.

The 2019 class, which will join the 82 business leaders now in the hall of fame, will be inducted at a gala dinner Feb. 8, 2019, in Little Rock.

In selecting inductees, the committee considers outstanding leadership in establishing, building or running a business; improving his or her community; and displaying the highest level of ethics.

Equal consideration is given to Arkansans – by birth or by choice – whose business achievements have been inside or outside of the state. Living inductees must be at least 60 years of age. Nominations are not limited to graduates of the Sam M. Walton College of Business or the University of Arkansas.

Student Snack Research Yields Real-World Marketers

When General Mills employees Kailey Reynolds, Kalyn Carroll, Shelby Mohs and Sophia Waller walked into marketing professor Molly Rapert’s marketing management class to lead a project, they knew what to expect.

Each is a former student of Rapert’s, and each uses concepts learned from her class at General Mills.

The four women on the General Mills team assigned Rapert’s spring senior-level students a specific General Mills product and related real-world problem, such as increasing market share or creating awareness. The teams of students were required to research products, survey consumers and make recommendations to improve sales. The project targeted General Mills brand Nature Valley bars, Annie’s mac and cheese and fruit snacks, Yoplait yogurt, cereals, and Totino’s frozen pizza rolls and party pizza.

Students read industry reports on packaging and snacking trends, looked at the definition and awareness of U.S.D.A. organic labels and documented store product placement. Students also studied millennial snack expectations and trending healthy options.

After their research, students worked directly with consumers to learn shopping behaviors, purchasing drivers, product impressions and shopping demographics. To do that they used Field Agent, a mobile application that asks consumers to give feedback while shopping. The student teams created surveys to get feedback about General Mills products, demographics, packaging, purchasing triggers and more.

The team from General Mills is joined by Molly Rapert, associate professor, Department of Marketing (second from left), and includes (l-r) Kailey Reynolds, business category associate; Kalyn Carroll, business management associate; Shelby Mohs, business category lead; and Sophia Waller, trade planning associate.
The team from General Mills is joined by Molly Rapert, associate professor, Department of Marketing (second from left), and includes (l-r) Kailey Reynolds, business category associate; Kalyn Carroll, business management associate; Shelby Mohs, business category lead; and Sophia Waller, trade planning associate.

To assist students, the General Mills team personally paid for a large portion of the Field Agent licenses. They also served as advisers throughout the project and assigned products and related challenges to each team.

Field Agent, a Fayetteville-based company that “gathers data and insights from consumers around the world,” treated the students as General Mills employees. They showed students how to build an eight-question survey and analyze the data.

Soon the students began to get data from consumers around the nation.

The project culminated with team presentations showcasing their research, survey results and recommendations.

“It gives a great snapshot of what consumers think,” Rapert said.

The class and the General Mills team voted on projects and presentations. Winners were:

The Nature Valley bars (9:30 a.m.) team: Best Recommendations and Insight

Nature Valley team: Front row (l-r) – Chloe Elkins, Anna Nettles, Caroline Sontag. Back row (l-r) – Landri McGregor, Jase Rapert.
Nature Valley team:
Front row (l-r) – Chloe Elkins, Anna Nettles, Caroline Sontag. Back row (l-r) – Landri McGregor, Jase Rapert.

Totino’s Pizza Rolls (9:30 a.m.) team: Best Slides and Organization

Totino’s Best team: Front row (l-r) – Marianne Muyia, Morgan Myers, Kacie Watson. Back row (l-r) – Raka’ Pinkerton, Brittany Stettmeier, Cal Davies.
Totino’s Best team:
Front row (l-r) – Marianne Muyia, Morgan Myers, Kacie Watson. Back row (l-r) – Raka’ Pinkerton, Brittany Stettmeier, Cal Davies.

Annie’s Fruit Snacks (11 a.m.) team: Best Overall

Annie’s photo: Front row (l-r) – Piper Gullickson, Leighten Warren, Hannah Danford, Krupali Krushiker. Back row (l-r) – Cole McQuirk, William King.
Annie’s team:
Front row (l-r) – Piper Gullickson, Leighten Warren, Hannah Danford, Krupali Krushiker. Back row (l-r) – Cole McQuirk, William King.

“There were aha moments we will share with our teams,” said Shelby Mohs, business category lead at General Mills.

The Nature Valley team learned that companies are creating more portable and healthier breakfast food, millennials are driving the healthier trends and 94 percent of Americans snack at least once a day. Based on survey results of Sam’s Club shoppers regarding Nature Valley Granola Cups, Biscuits and Layered Bars, most shoppers viewed them as a mid-day snack on the go, with the most popular product being the Layered Bars.

Using what they learned from the data, the team recommended moving Granola Cups to the cracker aisle, changing the Biscuit product placement and advertising specific function on each product.

The Totino’s Pizza Roll team researched packaging and found that consumers want smaller and more sustainable snack packaging. The millennial consumer is open to unique and adventurous new flavors. The team also found that the Totino’s brand has a high affinity with the consumer, even with bargain shoppers.

With this in mind, the team encouraged sales promotions with discounts and coupons, a more portable package design and additional flavor options and dipping sauces.

The Annie’s Fruit Snack team found that 52 percent of consumers are influenced by packaging and labeling, 68 percent are willing to pay more for foods that contain healthy ingredients and 39 percent would switch to brands that provide more accurate product information. Their research also found that 43 percent of millennials expect organic, 49 percent expect GMO-free, 64 percent expect sustainable and 56 percent expect recyclable products and packaging. The two strongest brands in the fruit snack category were Annie’s and Welch’s products.

After surveying consumers about the USDA Organic Seal and product price, the students determined that shoppers valued price first and natural colors and flavors second. They also noted the shelf placement needed to be stronger.

From Start to Finish

Molly Rapert, Associate Professor
Molly Rapert
Associate Professor

Ten years ago, Molly Rapert, associate professor of marketing, decided to create an advisory board for her marketing management senior-level classes. She wanted to know what issues and challenges the members thought were important to industry. With this in mind, she emailed 15 professionals asking them to complete a survey regarding the challenges they see every day. Those 15 forwarded it to others and the survey began to have a life of its own.

More than 700 survey responses later, Rapert decided to throw out the textbook and redesign her classes focusing on real-world issues. She followed up with her original 15 and they began to send “must read” weekly readings for her students.

“Dr. Rapert develops and maintains relationships with approximately 16 executives who serve as advisers as she designs the class experience, format and content,” said alumnus and advisory board member Jesse Lane, chief marketing officer for Pure Charity. “These business leaders make up the advisory board and submit articles, give ideas for weekly assignments, serve as guest speakers, and provide corporate partnerships for each semester.”

“Molly utilized articles this group sends her to develop relevant, current knowledge lectures for her students so that they leave and lead with the latest thinking in marketing, management, human relations, thought leadership and general business perspective,” said advisory board member Rich Lawrence, vice president, Special Markets, Helen of Troy. “Priceless!”

“As a student, Dr. Rapert’s class was challenging, fascinating and noticeably different. I learned to build new relationships, read relevant books and articles, and I was required to communicate well in written form. It turns out, these skills have each been critically important in my career,” Lane said. “In Marketing Management, I began to gain confidence for my career and could imagine, for the first time, how to be a successful marketer.”

Banner Year for Startup Teams in Regional, National Competitions

The medical device company Lapovations of the University of Arkansas received first place and best elevator pitch at the University of Oregon New Venture Championship competition. It was the team’s sixth overall victory in startup contests this year, with five of the wins coming in highly competitive national competitions. This victory establishes Lapovations as the most successful startup competition team in U of A history and brought their cash and investment winnings to just over $300,000.

Lapovations is led by graduate students in the College of Engineering and the Sam M. Walton College of Business. The team also took first place and best elevator pitch at the statewide Delta Plastics Arkansas Governor’s Cup, where University of Arkansas teams swept the graduate division awards and won first and second-place awards in the undergraduate agriculture track.

Lapovations: (l-r) Flavia Araujo, Michael Dunavant, and Jared Greer [Photo Courtesy Rice University]
Lapovations: (l-r) Flavia Araujo, Michael Dunavant, and Jared Greer [Photo Courtesy Rice University]
Lapovations is developing a platform of products that improve minimally invasive surgery. The company’s CEO, Jared Greer, is a master’s student in the Department of Biomedical Engineering. Flavia Araujo, a full-time M.B.A. student, and Michael Dunavant, an executive M.B.A. student, also competed as part of the team. The three students met in the graduate-level New Venture Development course taught by Carol Reeves, associate vice chancellor for entrepreneurship, whose teams have won more national business competitions since 2009 than those from any other university in America.

More Than a Class

“What people should understand about Dr. Reeves’ class is that it is not just an academic exercise,” said Jared Greer, CEO of Lapovations. “For teams like ours who have a viable business idea or commercial technology, it’s more like an accelerator program. In addition to excellent classroom instruction, we received in-depth mentoring from a network of experts, access to angel and venture capital investors, seed funding for customer validation from the Delta I-Fund, and around-the-clock coaching from our advisers during competition season. It was a lot of work but also the best possible preparation for starting and growing a new business.”

Lapovations also took second place in the prestigious Rice University Business Plan Competition and first in the Baylor University New Venture Competition, SXSW Pitch Texas, Stu Clark Investment Competition at the University of Manitoba, and the Brown-Forman Cardinal Challenge at the University of Louisville. They took second place at the Ivey Business Plan Competition at Western University in Canada.

“Bringing new technologies to the life science market is more challenging than many people imagine,” said Reeves. “Lapovations’ stunning success in national startup competitions bodes well for the company’s future and each of the team members’ individual futures, because it is a direct result of their hard work, diligence, and willingness to learn from medical industry experts and potential customers.”

An Arkansas Tradition

Arkansas’ flagship business plan competition, the Delta Plastics Arkansas Governor’s Cup, attracts undergraduate and graduate teams from many of the state’s public and private institutions of higher learning. Lapovations was joined by U of A New Venture Development Teams UChooze Lunchbox and Ozark Microheater Systems, who won second and third place, respectively, in the graduate division. OMS also won the graduate division innovation award, which carried a cash prize of $5,000.

Two undergraduate teams from the University of Arkansas, Connor Innovation Roveround and SCAN Ag, won first and second place, respectively, in the agriculture track.

Sponsored in 2018 by Delta Plastics with a cash prize pool of $154,000, the Arkansas Governor’s Cup has since 2001 been organized by Arkansas Capital, through its 501(c)(3) Arkansas Economic Acceleration Foundation (AEAF).

Delta Plastics Arkansas Governor’s Cup

Overall Graduate Winners

Lapovations wins 2018 Governor's Cup.
Lapovations wins 2018 Governor’s Cup.

1st Place: $25,000
Lapovations LLC
University of Arkansas
Team: Jared Greer, Michael Dunavant, Flavia Araujo
Advisers: Carol Reeves, Sarah Goforth

2nd Place: $15,000
Uchooze Lunchbox LLC
University of Arkansas
Team: William Rockefeller, Leslie Godwin, Daniel Maldonado, Rebecca Holgate, Tanya Welihindha
Advisers: Carol Reeves, Sarah Goforth

3rd Place: $10,000
Ozark Microheater Systems
University of Arkansas
Team: Benjamin McGuire, Joel Harris, Nicholas Holt, Jordan Wilcox
Advisers: Carol Reeves, Sarah Goforth

Innovation Division

Graduate: $5,000
Ozark Microheater Systems
University of Arkansas
Team: Benjamin McGuire, Joel Harris, Nicholas Holt, Jordan Wilcox
Advisers: Carol Reeves, Sarah Goforth

Agriculture Division 

Connor Innovation Roveround take first place in agriculture division.
Connor Innovation Roveround take first place in agriculture division.

1st Place: $5,000
Connor Innovation Roveround
University of Arkansas
Team: Cara Conner, Grant Conner
Adviser: Jeremy Powell

SCAN AG takes 2nd place in the agriculture division.
SCAN AG takes 2nd place in the agriculture division.

2nd Place: $3,000
SCAN AG
University of Arkansas
Team: Henderson Clement, Bailey Pratt, Branson Vanlandingham
Adviser: Mark Zweig

Elevator Pitch

Graduate: $2,000
Lapovations LLC
University of Arkansas
Team: Jared Greer, Michael Dunavant, Flavia Araujo
Advisers: Carol Reeves, Sarah Goforth

About the Office of Entrepreneurship and Innovation: The mission of the University of Arkansas’ Office of Entrepreneurship and Innovation is to catalyze entrepreneurial activities and innovation across the university and throughout the state in order to build Arkansas’ knowledge-based economy and support healthy, sustainable communities. Since 2009, University of Arkansas students have won more national business plan competitions – 27 in all – than any other institution.

Think. Plan. Do.

Thea Winston, a senior accounting major from Forrest City, Arkansas, is a thinker and a planner. She gathers pertinent information, dwells on it, creates a plan and then executes it. Information gathering is what led her to the Sam M. Walton College of Business and has kept her on track ever since.

When Winston was in high school in eastern Arkansas, she began to critique her likes and dislikes to plan for her future. She hated blood and gore, so medicine was a definite no. She liked numbers and logic, which led her to work after school at certified public accountant Sharon Wilson’s office in Forrest City.

While there, Winston performed administrative duties – answered the phone, made copies, filed materials – and was able to tackle the occasional accounting task and observe her boss at work. She learned what an accountant does and saw first hand that the work suited her. She realized she could become a CPA.

Her task became: Find a college that fit.

Over two summers, Winston attended two week-long residential programs at Walton College – Technology Awareness Program and Business Leadership Academy – where she met faculty and staff, lived on campus, befriended other campers and applied for scholarships.

After that, her mind was made up. Walton College was her choice and accounting was her major.

Helping Out

Winston’s summer camp programs eased her transition into college. She had made friends at both programs and reconnected with them in her freshmen year. She also met Barbara Lofton, the director of Walton’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion.

“Dr. Lofton is always willing to help,” Winston said. “She always checked up on me. She gives you tough love and is always there.”

Thea Winston [photo credit: Ryan C. Versey]
Thea Winston
[photo credit: Ryan C. Versey]
Winston’s Honors adviser for the past four years is Jason Adams, the associate director of Walton’s Honors Program, who was always there for Winston as well. She cites Susan Anders, the assistant director of Global Engagement, as another Walton staff member who was equally friendly and supportive.

“She always made time to answer my questions,” Winston said.

With the support of these Walton College staff, it is no surprise that Winston was an active participant in the Honors Program and Study Abroad and scholarship opportunities.

During her high school summer camp programs, Winston applied for and became a Boyer Fellow. The fellowship is earmarked for business students from Arkansas who have earned a 32 ACT or 1450 SAT college admission exams, along with a 3.75 grade point average and pays for her tuition, fees, books, room and board and other academic expenses.

Winston has also received the Arkansas Academic Challenge and Arkansas Governor’s Distinguished Scholarships, as well as scholarships from Tyson and Conoco Phillips. Talking to Walton faculty and staff helped her find scholarships.

“They’ve helped out so much,” Winston said. “I see a lot of students struggle and I know that worrying impacts their studies. It (scholarships) allowed me to focus on what I was doing academically.”

The scholarships also had an impact on her parents who have two kids in college. Winston’s brother, Avery, is an engineering student at the University of Arkansas.

Walton World View

In addition to studying accounting and general business, Winston expanded her working business knowledge through an internship for two summers at Ernst & Young in Atlanta. She also participated in Walton’s study abroad program to learn about Vietnamese culture and business practices.

Thea Winston
During a service project in Vietnam, Winston works with team members to power and heat resident housing.

In 2015, the summer before sophomore year, Winston traveled to Vietnam for a month with five other Walton students. For two weeks, she worked on a community development project building individual greenhouse systems to power and heat resident housing. Working with other business and agriculture students from the University of Arkansas, Thea learned from Vietnamese students who served as mentors and translators.

The travelers stayed on a Vietnamese university campus for two weeks. They slept on mats lying directly on a twin-size bed frame – Winston bought a second mat to create a softer bed. The food also was a change for the Arkansas native. Breakfast was often meat with rice, along with coffee with sweetened condensed milk ladled on top. One of her favorite meals was a beef dish with a sauce. She avoided the fish dishes if the eyes and head were intact.

Thea Winston
Thea Winston

“The first year we went, none of us had much of an idea of what we would be doing or how successful the program would ultimately be,” said Stephen Kopp, associate professor for the Department of Marketing. “Whether she realizes it, Thea was instrumental in the initial and continuing impact of this program. This was a brand-new program, and I was still working on the details. Her consistent question was, ‘My mom wants to know how is this relevant to my major?’ This compelled me, and still does, to make sure that the students understand the relevance of our work in Vietnam. I think she did not and does not realize the impact of her mom’s question has had on every aspect of the Vietnam program.”

In spring 2017, Winston attended the University of Sussex in South England in the University of Arkansas’ exchange program. She took four classes there – international business, ethics, race and ethnicity, and leadership – with students from Russia, Switzerland, the Middle East and England. The experience taught her about multi-national enterprises, racial issues in other countries and group dynamics with diverse members.

During her time in England, she learned many people there knew American politics, but most Americans were not in tune with world politics. She now sees the importance of being aware of global issues including political ones. She keeps up with her fellow students from her travels via social media.

Stateside

At the University of Arkansas, several classes and professors were especially thought provoking for Thea. Katie Terrell, an instructor for the Department of Accounting, taught Accounting Technology, where Winston learned about data analysis and the coding needed for accounting systems. It gave her insight into a different aspect of her major.

Thea Winston [photo credit: Ryan C. Versey]
Thea Winston [photo credit: Ryan C. Versey]
“She (Katie Terrell) enjoyed her job; it made me enjoy her class,” Winston said.

The Honors Economics Colloquium class taught by Amy Farmer, a professor in the Department of Economics, tackled life decisions, which involved economic thinking and decision making.

“Thea took my Honors colloquium course, which is a discussion-based economics class requiring a lot of critical thinking about any number of issues, some of which are controversial,” Farmer said. “Thea was an active participant in that class, adding a lot of insight and perspectives that added to the class.  She showed a great deal of maturity and ability to think critically, which impressed me quite a bit. I look forward to seeing what happens in Thea’s future.”

Next Steps

After Winston graduates in May with a bachelor’s degree in accounting, she will attend Vanderbilt University to earn a master’s degree in accounting. Once she graduates from Vanderbilt, she hopes to work at a public accounting firm in consulting, auditing or tax accounting for several years and then reevaluate her professional goals and direction.

No doubt, her skills at researching an issue, creating a plan and executing the plan will aid her on her journey to Nashville and beyond.

New Student Jobs at the McMillon Innovation Studio

Beginning in fall 2018, the McMillon Innovation Studio will be forming innovation design teams that will focus on prototyping new models of delivery, services, products and policies in the areas of (1) health and well-being, (2) supply chain and (3) seamless commerce. We will be hiring student project leaders for each of these teams, who will have the opportunity to travel, create and innovate for real impact, gain job experience, earn potential credit hours, and receive potential funding to support innovation prototypes. All majors are welcome to apply.

The McMillon Innovation Studio seeks to shape the future of commerce by inspiring students to be catalysts of innovation.

For more information regarding student job opportunities, visit:

Students with creative, innovative ideas in health and well-being, supply chain or seamless commerce are welcome to join a design team being in fall 2018. Contact Rachel Sullivant at rsullivant@walton.uark.edu for additional information.

Miller Named Walton College Employee of the Quarter

Kim Miller, facilities coordinator for the Walton Conference Hub, has been named employee of the third quarter by the Sam M. Walton College of Business.

Anyone in the college may nominate colleagues for the award, which is given to employees who show superior customer service that enhances the image of the college, above and beyond the scope of that employee’s job description.

Along with Miller, this quarter’s nominees were Pamela Heinzel of the Department of Marketing, Julie Stagner of the Graduate School of Business, Jason Adams of the Honors Program, Jeff Hood of Undergraduate Programs, and Lee Ann Looney also of Undergraduate Programs.

The winner receives a certificate of appreciation and a cash prize. Winners are chosen by Walton College Dean Matt Waller, the associate deans, the assistant deans and the Walton College Staff Council.

Rongers Joins Walton Development Team

Erin Rongers has been named associate director of development for the Sam M. Walton College of Business effective April 11, 2018.

Erin Rongers, Associate Director of Development
Erin Rongers
Associate Director of Development

“It is a tremendous honor to join the Sam M. Walton College of Business as the associate director of development,” Rongers said. “I am looking forward to working with our alumni, faculty and staff and securing philanthropic support for Walton programs and initiatives.”

Prior to joining the Walton team, Rongers served as the executive director for The Cancer Challenge chapter in Bentonville, Ark., where she oversaw development, board and volunteer management and general business operations. In this role, she was responsible for corporate partnerships, special events and individual giving. She also managed an annual, large-scale fundraising event, which required the coordination of 140 corporate sponsors, more than 2,000 participants and 350 volunteers.

Previously, Rongers worked as the executive director for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northwest Arkansas, where she managed business planning, board development, fund development, programs and community relations.

“Erin’s extensive experience and connections in the northwest Arkansas development community will be a huge asset for Walton College,” said John Erck, senior director of development. “She already knows a lot of our supporters, and she has a track record of sustained success. I’m thrilled to have her on our team.”

Rongers holds a bachelor’s degree in communications studies from the University of Texas and a master’s degree in recreation with a concentration in sport management from the University of Arkansas. She is a member of the Association of Fundraising Professionals.

Boundless

Noel Morris is motivated. As an instructor for the Department of Finance at the Sam M. Walton College of Business, he enjoys teaching and working directly with students. He loves his wife and two adult sons and delights in spending time with his granddaughter. Yet a service project outside of home and career has created additional purpose, joy and satisfaction and has changed his life in the process.

“I think I know why I’m here,” Morris said. “Next to raising my two boys, this is the most significant thing I’ve done.”

Working with his local Rotary Club in Springdale, Arkansas, Rotary District 6110 and American Wheelchair Mission – a nonprofit based in Henderson, Nevada – Morris has been raising funds and awareness for the purchase and delivery of wheelchairs for those in need in third world countries. Morris didn’t go looking for this project – it came to him.

In 2002, Morris was the incoming president for his Rotary Club, an international service organization dedicated to creating a better world. He attended an international Rotarian conference at which Chris Lewis, the president of the American Wheelchair Mission, introduced a wheelchair initiative. Morris’ local chapter adopted the service project, purchased wheelchairs and delivered them to disabled children and adults in Mexico.

“You would think after 16 years I’d be a little jaded, but this last trip was the best,” Morris said.

Morris (left) assists a wheelchair recipient in Mexico. [photo credit: American Wheelchair Mission]
Morris (left) assists a wheelchair recipient in Mexico. [photo credit: American Wheelchair Mission]
According to the World Health Organization, 65 million people need a wheelchair. Those in need who happen to live in a developing country face severe challenges in accessing a wheelchair, attending school, securing a job and enjoying basic quality of life.

The American Wheelchair Mission estimates the need even higher at 100 million people who are in need of a wheelchair.

The need is plainly apparent for the Rotarians as they deliver wheelchairs to mobility limited adults or children carried by their parents. Mobility issues affect the entire family. A wheelchair can allow parents to move older, heavier children. Parents can attend work and children can attend school. Wheelchairs can give owners self respect and power over their own lives.

Video courtesy of American Wheelchair Mission.

“I can easily say Noel’s actions in coordinating and distributing wheelchairs has changed the lives of literally thousands of families,” said Randy Hale, a photographer who has recorded eight years of wheelchair deliveries for the American Wheelchair Mission.

Morris shared a memory of Javier, a wheelchair recipient in Mexico who became paralyzed after falling out of a coconut tree at work. The father of two girls, Javier had been restricted to a bed for nine years. He heard about the wheelchair distribution and, even though he was not on recipient list, dragged himself to a taxi and approached the wheelchair give-away. The Rotarians made sure to find an extra wheelchair for him.

Morris said that Javier’s response was “You’ve made me a man again.” Now he can hold a job and help his young daughters get to school.

Morris and a mom hug after her daughter receives a new wheelchair. [photo credit: American Wheelchair Mission]
Morris and a mom hug after her daughter receives a new wheelchair. [photo credit: American Wheelchair Mission]
When delivering the chairs in Mexico, the Springdale Rotarians partner with the American Wheelchair Mission and the Center for Rehabilitation Infantile Telethon and local Rotarians. The center and the local Rotary Club each develop a list of those in need. The center provides rehabilitation for the wheelchair recipients as well.

As children grow older, they bring back their chairs to get a larger chair. In turn, the chair is refurbished and re-distributed to others in need. The cost of one shipping container with 280 wheelchairs is $42,000, plus shipping.

The Rotarians in Springdale target those with mobility limitations outside the United States because many inside the United States can qualify for a wheelchair through insurance programs, Veteran Affairs or Medicaid. Other countries do not have similar health care initiatives.

Morris is a member of the Rotary Club in Springdale and serves as the Rotary’s district chair for the wheelchair initiative. He also serves on the board of the American Wheelchair Mission. On a regular basis, Morris speaks to other Rotary Clubs and community groups about the service project.

Video Project Highlights Shook’s Freshman Business Connections Class

Freshman year is life changing. Everything – from laundry and dorm rooms to classes and free time – is new and different. Teens are expected to navigate through classes and campus, manage their time and thrive on their own.

To help students’ transition to this new lifestyle, Carole Shook, an instructor for the Department of Supply Chain Management at the Sam M. Walton College of Business, created a team project to encourage freshmen to get to know each other, discover resources on campus and strengthen personal development skills.

Freshman Business Connections students visit the McMillon Innovation Studio.
Freshman Business Connections students visit the McMillon Innovation Studio.

Within her fall 2017 Freshman Business Connections class, Shook assigned a team project to create a video overview of the McMillon Innovation Studio on campus and then present their findings in class. The studio, a gift from Walmart chief executive officer and Walton graduate Doug McMillon and his wife Shelley, tests new technologies and is designed to impact the future of retail. The project, designed by McMillon Innovation Studio director Clint Johnson and Shook, required teamwork, time management, exploration of Walton College resources and networking with classmates.

Freshman Business Connections, often referred to as FBC, is taught to first-year business students to acclimate them to campus, understand what resources are available to them, introduce them to other freshman and help them be successful at the Walton College. It introduces them to David W. Mullins Library for research, academic integrity and ethics, the Business Communications Lab for writing assistance, the Credit Counseling of Arkansas for personal finance management, Walton Career Services for job readiness and the degree opportunities at Walton. The class also helps students’ transition from high school to college by nurturing personal development skills such as time management, stress management, financial planning, health and wellness, diversity and team building.

“I would say team management was the greatest skill I improved at,” said Jay Lovaas, a freshman from Canton, Ga. “I had to effectively communicate with my team members, help with any questions they may have had, and rely on them to check my work as I checked theirs.”

After selecting teams, the freshmen interviewed staff and students at the studio and created outlines for videos and presentations. Each student was responsible for a portion of the project and collaborated with the team on deliverables.

Team members Ryan Hardwick, Alexis Humm, Cydney Feinstone, Elijah Kaplan and interviewer Noah Tidmore recorded video, captured still photography, created graphics and wrote interview questions. In their video below, freshman Noah Tidmore interviews Kayla Bruskas, a senior accounting student and student manager for the McMillon Innovation Studio.

Team members for this video include Ryan Hardwick, Alexis Humm, Cydney Feinstone, Elijah Kaplan and interviewer Noah Tidmore.

“This project was created to show that freshmen students can do amazing things,” Shook said. “These were great students who worked hard and with enthusiasm.”

Throughout the project, students learned about the opportunities at the McMillon Studio, got to know their team members and explored campus. Simply put, the project helped freshmen get connected to their new life on campus.

“It was just a fun class,” Lovaas said. “It gets you in the flow of going to class during your first semester. In my opinion, the greatest thing about FBC is meeting people.”

University of Arkansas Enactus Team Named Regional Champs

The University of Arkansas Enactus team won the regional championship at the Enactus Southeastern Regional Competition and advances to the national competition in May.

The team took the title at the regional competition in Dallas on Monday, April 16. At that competition, the team presented three projects they designed and implemented this academic year. These projects create an impact for residents in Northwest Arkansas fighting issues with homelessness, recidivism among youth and unemployment of disabled adults.

This is the first time in eight years that the University of Arkansas Enactus team will advance to the Enactus National Competition, which will be held in Kansas City, Missouri, May 20-22.

About Enactus: Enactus, an international nonprofit organization, seeks to empower students to make a difference through sustainable, entrepreneurial action. Enactus is a community of student, academic and business leaders committed to using the power of entrepreneurial action to enable human progress. Through student programs on campuses across the nation, Enactus applies business concepts to develop entrepreneurial projects that transform lives and shape a better, more sustainable world.