Category Archives: Management

Simon and Colleagues Finalist for Scholarly Impact Award

Lauren Simon, an associate professor in the Department of Management at the Sam M. Walton College of Business at the University of Arkansas, and her co-authors were finalists for the 2020 Scholarly Impact Award by the Journal of Management for their paper Navigating uncharted waters: Newcomer socialization through the lens of stress theory.

The Journal of Management — a top journal in the field considered candidates for the award who published articles five years ago which had the greatest impact on the field. The journal evaluated how the article changed the field’s way of thinking, added to its knowledge base and influenced ongoing work in the field.

Lauren Simon
Lauren Simon, associate professor in the Department of Management at the Sam M. Walton College of Business

“My coauthors and I feel honored to have been one of a few final nominees given the tough competition and prestige of this journal,” Simon said.

Simon and co-authors A.M. Ellis of California Polytechnic State University; T.N. Bauer of Portland State University; L.R. Mansfield, currently at CPS HR Consulting who was at Portland State University when paper was published; B. Erdogan of Portland State University and D.M. Truxillo of University of Limerick in Ireland published the paper in 2015.

Their research focused on the integration between stress and socialization for new employees and ways in which organizational and employee-driven inputs can assist in building and acquiring important resources to cope with demands of a new work role.

“Given that a substantial aspect of new employee adjustment involves dealing with stress and uncertainty — and we’re all dealing with a lot of uncertainty right now — the insights from this research seem especially relevant in the current environment,” Simon said.

The winner of the award was R. E. Sturm and J. Antonakis who published Interpersonal power: A review, critique, and research agenda in the Journal of Management in 2015.

Delery Named Editor-in-Chief of Human Resource Management Review

John Delery

John E. Delery, head of the Department of Management at the Sam M. Walton College of Business at the University of Arkansas, is the new editor-in-chief of Human Resource Management Review.

Delery, who holds the Raymond F. Orr Chair in Management, officially assumed the editor-in-chief role Jan. 1.

Human Resource Management Review is a quarterly academic journal devoted to the publication of scholarly conceptual/theoretical articles pertaining to human resource management and allied fields, including industrial/organizational psychology, human capital, labor relations, organizational behavior and others.

“It is the top outlet for conceptual/theoretical manuscripts devoted solely to human resource management,” Delery said.

Delery received his M.S. in psychology from Memphis State University and earned a Ph.D. in business administration, focusing on human resource management, from Texas A&M University. He teaches a variety of management courses, including Managing People and Organizations, Organizational Staffing, and Leadership and Managing Behavior in Organizations.

Delery has won a number of academic and professional awards, including the Scholarly Achievement Award from the HR Division of the Academy of Management, two Best Conference Paper Awards from the HR Division of the Academy of Management, the Walton College Faculty Research Award in 2001-02, the Walton College Faculty Service Award in 2009-10 and the Walton College Faculty Teaching Award in 2014-15.

His current research interests include the strategic management of human capital, the structure of human resource management systems and employee selection. Specifically, he is interested in how the management of human capital influences organizational performance and profitability.

He is widely cited in academic circles and has published numerous research articles in management journals including the Academy of Management Journal, Strategic Management Journal, Personnel Psychology, Industrial Relations, Human Resource Management Review, Human Resource Management Journal, Journal of Organizational Behavior and the Journal of Applied Social Psychology.  His research has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Transportation, among others.

Napoleon’s Hubris, Ali’s Rope-a-Dope

Business Executives Also Base Decisions On Studying Their Rivals, Submissive or Provocative CEOs May Draw Attacks On Their Firms

Jason Ridge

History is replete with examples of military commanders and sporting combatants using their perceptions of rival decision-makers in deciding how to engage those rivals – such as Russian commanders employing Napoleon’s hubris against him and Muhammad Ali devising the ‘rope-a-dope’ strategy knowing his opponent would be ultra-aggressive.

According to a new study published in November’s Strategic Management Journal, modern business executives appear to be applying the same principles.

Prior research suggests that decision-makers actively gather information about their rivals’ likely actions and to a very high degree, base competitive maneuvers upon that information.  

“Despite this practical reality, however, neither the theories that explain the role of executives in a firm’s actions nor competitive dynamics research advance theoretical explanations of how this rival-based phenomenon unfolds,” write the authors, Aaron Hill, University of Florida, Tessa Recendes, Oklahoma State University and Jason Ridge, University of Arkansas.

The researchers saw a need to better understand how attackers’ perceptions of a rival CEO affect attacks on the CEO’s firm, and they articulate how CEOs possessing certain psychological, behavioral, and social characteristics may unknowingly precipitate competitive attacks on their firms. 

Their study integrates into management theories insights from victimology that explain how individuals are subject to more attacks if they possess characteristics others perceive as either more submissive or more provocative.

 “If rivals perceive a focal firm’s CEO as more submissive and hence, less willing or able to respond to attacks, those rivals will have less fear the CEO will attempt to counter in ways that might damage the attacking firm,” the authors say.

“For example, more submissive CEOs may be seen as unlikely to respond to a price cut directed at their firms. . . Attacks on firms led by such individuals, then, pose little threat to the attacking firm and provide greater prospects for strategic advancements without the fear of reprisal.”

Similarly, there are two reasons why a firm led by a CEO who is perceived as provocative would be subject to more attacks.

“First, more provocative individuals are attacked by rivals who seek to restore their view of what ‘ought to be’ or what they consider normal,” say the authors. “The attackers are motivated to ‘get even’ for perceived provocations.

“Second, more provocative individuals may threaten others’ relative standing or security, provoking attacks out of self-preservation (i.e., to ‘save face’ and/or to reduce or remove peril).”

For hypotheses testing, the researchers used a sample of Fortune 500 CEOs from 2000 to 2016 and employed videometric measurement of CEOs where third-party raters used validated instruments to assess personal characteristics. They then combined the videometric measures of CEOs with data drawn from RavenPack News Analytics. RavenPack uses a patented algorithm to classify and aggregate press releases, which are commonly used to capture a firm’s competitive actions.

The results: As CEO submissiveness increases from the mean value to one standard deviation above the mean, attacks on the CEO’s firm rise as follows: Pricing and Product Attacks nearly double while Marketing and Expansion Attacks increase about 64 and 48 percent, respectively.

Victimology research suggests that “victims” are seen as easier targets than those considered being “provocative” — even if being provocative is still a strong predictor.

Indeed, the study also found that as CEO provocativeness increases one standard deviation from the mean, the rise in attacks are smaller but also meaningful: Pricing, Product, Marketing, and Expansion Attacks increase about 50, 27, 35, and 58 percent, respectively.

The study is important because a single competitive attack or series of attacks can often have negative ramifications for firms directly while also triggering firms to respond by dedicating valuable resources, which could otherwise be directed elsewhere, toward counter-attacking. Increasing attacks anywhere from about 25 percent to 100 percent likely has substantial implications for firms.

It is possible that providing knowledge about how CEO characteristics precipitate competitive actions toward their firms may aid in prevention and intervention strategies.

However, in assessing if attacks on the CEO’s firm are mediated by the attacked firm’s competitive actions, the research results suggest that the attacks are not mediated by the attacked firm’s competitive actions.  And that holds true for both firms led by “submissive” CEOs and “provocative” CEOs.

The study, Second-order effects of CEO characteristics: How rivals’ perceptions of CEOs as submissive and provocative precipitate competitive attacks, was published in the Strategic Management Journal, the official journal of the Strategic Management Society, which is comprised of 3,000 academics, business practitioners, and consultants from 80 countries.

Movista Raises $12m to Further Leadership Position in Workforce Management Space

(EDITOR’S NOTE: Below is a press release from Movista Inc., a company founded by April Seggebruch (Walton College B.S.B.A. 2005) and Walton MBA 2008 and Stan Zylowski (Walton MBA 2008).)

Bentonville, Ark. September 26, 2018 – Movista Inc., the leader in cloud-based labor and workforce management software for retailers, manufacturers, and service providers, announced its $12 million Series A growth equity investment. Funds will be used to deliver new product features, enhance technology innovation, expand sales and marketing, bolster talent development, and evaluate strategic opportunities. The investment, among the largest ever in an Arkansas based software firm, is led by New York based Level Equity, a software focused growth specialist with $1.65 billion in assets under management.

Movista, which turned eight years old in May, pioneered the use of smart device applications for managing mobile workforces. Demand for smart device software in the workplace has more than doubled for three consecutive years, with Movista’s recurring revenues up more than 300% since 2015. More than forty retail-focused enterprise clients leverage their smart platform to manage employees and contractors. Movista expects over 200,000 retail workers to be working on a daily basis, via their software, by 2020.

“Our goal is to have one million daily users within five years,” said CEO and Co-Founder, Stan Zylowski, “We will leverage the capital from this investment to expand and augment our product set, build a best-in-class business development team and share our story nationally.” April Seggebruch, COO and Co-Founder, further explained how having fresh capital changes dynamics inside the firm. “For the first time since our inception as a bootstrapped business, we now have the freedom to push every technical limit and innovate dramatically. We have plans in place and within twelve months will be installing solutions that were unimaginable even a few years ago.”

“We have closely tracked the explosive growth of BYOD and dedicated smart device usage within the enterprise for years and proactively identified Movista early on as a leader in the space” said Ben Levin, Founder and Co-CEO of Level Equity, who has joined Movista’s board of directors as part of the financing. “Their history in the retail market, exceptional and capital efficient growth and passionate commitment to client success sets them apart. We share their vision for continuing to build a world class workforce and labor management software business for retailers, manufacturers, and service providers.”

About Movista: Based in Bentonville, AR, Movista is a provider of mobile-first, real-time, enterprise-grade technical solutions to the retail market. The company, founded in 2010, employs nearly sixty employees across six states and serves more than forty clients including retailers, manufacturers and service providers. To learn more about Movista, visit www.movista.com.

Potential Transfer Students Learn About Programs, Resources, Curriculum

Forty potential transfer students from Northwest Arkansas Community College visited the Sam M. Walton College of Business at the University of Arkansas to learn about programs, resources and curriculum in the college. Continue reading Potential Transfer Students Learn About Programs, Resources, Curriculum