Category Archives: Students

Meehan Receives Supply Chain Scholarship

McKenzie Meehan, a junior majoring in supply chain management at the Sam M. Walton College of Business, at the University of Arkansas, was awarded an Excellence in Education Scholarship by AWESOME (Achieving Women’s Excellence in Supply Chain Operations, Management, and Education). Meehan is one of five recipients nationally to receive the award.

AWESOME is comprised of women in executive roles in the supply chain industry. Each year the organization invites 22 universities with top supply chain programs to nominate one student to compete for the scholarship. Faculty members nominate young women currently enrolled in supply chain programs who demonstrate supply chain leadership.

“I am excited that McKenzie received this award because I believe that she embodies the characteristics that make for a successful supply chain leader,” said Stephanie Thomas, clinical assistant professor at the Walton College. “She is highly motivated, willing to work hard, equally comfortable in a leadership or supporting role, dependable and coachable. The connections she will make through this scholarship award will be invaluable to her future supply chain career.”

The AWESOME Excellence in Education scholarship will allow Meehan to participate in the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals EDGE Conference in Anaheim, California, in September 2019 and the AWESOME Symposium in May 2020.

“This scholarship allows me the chance to acquire knowledge and experience from incredible women and industry leading companies and then extend that investment from myself to the other students here at Walton College,” Meehan said.

Recently the Chancellor’s Commission on Women named Meehan one of the University of Arkansas’ Extraordinary Women. She also serves as the president of Women Impacting Supply Chain Excellence, a registered student organization on campus, and is a student member of the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals, a national professional organization. Meehan is personnel chair for the Chi Omega sorority and chairs the senior relations committee for the Student Alumni Board at the University of Arkansas. She interned with Academy Sports + Outdoors last summer and will intern with General Mills this summer. She hails from Overland Park, Kansas.

The additional student scholarship recipients for 2019 attend Michigan State University, Auburn University, Penn State and Syracuse University. Previous scholarship winners from the University of Arkansas are Kyani Alford, a 2016 recipient, and Monica Sewell, a 2018 recipient. 

ROAR Across Campus

In the fall of 2017, Anne Velliquette, a marketing clinical assistant professor at the Sam M. Walton College of Business, watched her son view a series of online videos about alcohol and substance abuse, a requirement for all incoming freshmen. She questioned what he retained and how seriously he viewed the content.

Anne Velliquette, faculty adviser
Anne Velliquette, faculty adviser

“I wondered whether it was at all effective in educating our freshmen on the reality of what they were about to embark on as a college student with new freedoms and plenty of opportunities to consume alcohol in an unhealthy way,” Velliquette said. 

Ironically, soon after, she was contacted by Sarah Stokowski, a recreation and sport management assistant professor in the College of Education and Health Professions, who was seeking assistance from a marketing professor for a collaborative grant application regarding alcohol abuse prevention on campus.

 The timing was perfect.

In collaboration with several university departments and programs, Stokowski submitted a successful grant application and the University of Arkansas was awarded the NCAA CHOICES grant for $30,000 over a three-year period. The grant provides funding to reduce alcohol abuse on campus through a partnership with athletics and other campus groups.

The grant led to the development of ROAR –Razorbacks Offering Accountability Resources – a new registered student organization on campus open to all students at the university. Its mission is to encourage students to drink responsibly and to look after others who may be drinking.

Ridge Stringer serves as co-president for ROAR.
Ridge Stringer serves as co-president for ROAR.

Of the 15 universities receiving CHOICES funding, the University of Arkansas program is unique. Instead of driving the program through athletics, administrators, professors or student affairs – a restrictive delivery – the ROAR program encourages healthy behavior through peer-to-peer interaction.

“We feel like if we approach from a student-led side, with the goal of having fun and prioritizing SAFE drinking, NOT abstinence, it will give us a great shot of being successful,” said Ridge Stringer, ROAR co-president and senior majoring in marketing at Walton College.

ROAR educates students about alcohol use in fun, approachable ways. In February 2019, ROAR arranged a tour of the Black Apple Cidery in Springdale to learn about how cider is made and learn about safe consumption.

Red Solo cups (trash cans painted red) help draw attention to ROAR's Got Water? campaign on campus.
Red Solo cups (trash cans painted red) help draw attention to ROAR’s Got Water? campaign on campus.

“Another project is our Got Water? campaign,” Stringer said. “This campaign allows us to use those big red Solo cups (trash cans painted red) to put water in, and have those at various events on campus to make sure students stay hydrated. This campaign is organized and ready to go. We plan on using it at events like IFC Row Week, Razorback baseball games in the Hog Pen, and at the student entry before football games.”

Stringer hopes that students will be receptive to free bottles of water and will incorporate water into their party plans. With this in mind, ROAR has partnered with the risk management chairpersons at fraternities and sororities.

“We plan on those RMCs being ROAR ambassadors in their respective houses, in order to spread the word on ROAR, and push our initiatives to them,” Stringer added.

In its inaugural year, ROAR has 80 members who have implemented numerous projects and has collaborated with several campus-wide organizations.  One such collaboration is with Emery Gower, a wellness specialist for substance use who works in the Department of Wellness and Health Promotion at the university.

 Gower teaches students on campus wellness skills to counteract drug and alcohol abuse, overeating, poor spending habits, negative relationships or other risky behaviors.

“My goal is to shift from an often preachy way of talking to students and what they are doing wrong to one that is more driven by what they are doing right and how they can do more of that,” Gower said. “ROAR fits with these goals because they are inspiring a group of students to help normalize the fact that you can drink responsibly and still have a good time.”

ROAR also partners with University of Arkansas Police Department, Greek Life, College of Education and Health Professions, University Housing, Counseling and Psychological Services, Department of Athletics and Walton College.

Working with campus-wide partners, ROAR has four main goals.

  1. Develop and deliver bystander intervention training.
  2. Create and disseminate marketing materials to educate students about alcohol use and abuse.
  3. Create awareness about resources available to students regarding alcohol education and abuse prevention.  
  4. Decrease risky behavior involving alcohol.

The program targets all students at the university, but especially freshmen, student-athletes and members of Greek life. One way ROAR tries to educate students is through social media campaigns.

ROAR created awareness and recruited new members by participating in Walton College's Block Party in August.
ROAR created awareness and recruited new members by participating in Walton College’s Block Party in August.

“There’s approximately 27,000 students at the U of A, and it’s hard for a brand new RSO to establish great awareness fast. This is why we participate in almost every outreach event we can, including creating our own,” Stringer said. “Social media is big for us. We recently had a social media giveaway where prizes included Uber gift cards and other cool stuff. That alone netted us nearly 400 more followers, and over 1,500 comments on the post.”

Working with University Housing, resident advisers in all dorms will receive bystander training, as will fraternity and sorority leaders, ROAR officers and other ambassadors. In fall 2018, ROAR held workshops during Freshman Business Connections classes, which are required of all freshman enrolled in Walton College. ROAR won the SOOIE Event of the Month Award for their involvement in these workshops.

“One of our student officers shared his own freshman testimony/story about his poor choices with alcohol and how this impacted him,” Velliquette said. “He had such a powerful impact being a senior in a fraternity – someone younger students could relate to.”

The group has also participated in Walton College’s Block Party event, held the first week of fall classes, to create awareness and recruit new members. In addition, they’ve hosted T-shirt giveaways in front of the Arkansas Union and held meet-ups at local stores such as Bearded Goat Apparel.

Academic Focus
While ROAR focuses on peer behavior, Stokowski has utilized the grant for research opportunities.

Sara Stokowski, faculty adviser
Sara Stokowski, faculty adviser

“Countless studies have demonstrated that student-athletes, first year students and students involved in Greek life are at risk of alcohol abuse. Combined, these populations make up 40 percent of our campus. The CHOICES grant has allowed us to begin several studies looking at the campus culture regarding alcohol,” Stokowski said. “We have several surveys out right now inquiring about students’ drinking behaviors, attitudes towards drinking, as well as mental health. So, when all of the data is finally collected, it will be very cool to see the impact ROAR has had. We do know that alcohol related educational sanctions are down nearly 20 percent from last year to this year when we started ROAR.”

Just as Stokowski’s research relates to the ROAR grant, Velliquette pulls it into the classroom.

“We jointly discussed how we could use my classes to help come up with the name, logo and event ideas.  We also discussed the idea of a peer-to-peer program with a registered student organization,” Velliquette said. “Starting ROAR the RSO has been much like starting a new business and it has been amazing to watch the students running it learn and grow!” 

“It is so encouraging to see so many students want to be involved in efforts to help their peers understand the negative consequences of alcohol abuse, and the importance of having a life-long healthy relationship with alcohol,” Velliquette said. “I hope ROAR can help change the alcohol culture on campus and impact lives. I know it is a tall order, but even if it makes a dent in reducing alcohol abuse it is worth it.”

The Story of the Four Ps

“One day, four brothers and sisters sat watching their favorite TV show. As they sat around the TV, a commercial came on playing the theme … ♪♬♩♪ Market-Os, Market-Os. Everybody loves Market-Os!  ♪♬♩♪

“After the commercial ended, each of the four little Ps was so excited to tell the others what they thought was the most important part of marketing.”

And so begins the story of the four Ps of marketing – product, price, place and promotion.

The Assignment

The 4 Ps of Marketing was written by Walton seniors Alexandra Bailey (marketing major), Sydney Carson (management major) and Victoria Slaby (marketing major).
The 4 Ps of Marketing was written by Walton seniors Alexandra Bailey (marketing major), Sydney Carson (management major) and Victoria Slaby (marketing major).

In clinical assistant professor Rebecca Miles’ marketing management class, students study marketing strategies and tactics from a management perspective. They delve into products, pricing, promotion and placement. They also discuss product life cycles, ethical practices and market research.

To highlight these concepts, Miles had student teams write and illustrate children’s short stories focusing on these marketing elements.

“The main objective was to get them engaged with marketing concepts in relaxed, fun way then have them write about something they know for a target market who is very different from them,” Miles said.

Projects explained on an elementary school level the ideas of market research, marketing strategies or marketing ethics.  In one such tale, “Molly Learns Marketing,” the main character – Molly – learns the six values marketing professionals embody: honesty, fairness, responsibility, trust, respect and citizenship.

As told by seniors Maddy Long, Julia Bianchi, Courtney Gray and Audrey Allen, the protagonist Molly learns these values through discussions with her mom, chores at home, expectations in the classroom, playing with friends, cleaning up the playground and taking care of her pets.

Woo Piggie Marketing Project by Savannah Nelson, Julie Pham, Quintin Ruiz and Lauren Abbott.
Woo Piggie Marketing Project by Savannah Nelson, Julie Pham, Quintin Ruiz and Lauren Abbott.

Several student teams wrote about lemonade stands to discuss product, pricing, placement and promotion. Other teams did it using chocolates, muffins sales or school parties.

To explore market research, the student team of Spencer Bone, Omero Rodriguez, Emily McAlister, Patrick Biggs and Roger Vang, demonstrated the concept through a young boy’s desire to become president of his fourth grade class. The main character, Cornelius, learned that he should gather information about the wants and needs of his class, such as extra recess time and pizza in the cafeteria, and then deliver those items.

Through simple story telling, students were able to describe and explain the basic strategies and tactics of marketing without using industry jargon or complex theories.

And with that in mind, every good story deserves a good ending.

“Finally Market Mom walks in and tells her four little Ps that product, place, price and promotion are equally important in marketing. They are all special in their own way, but they are stronger when they work together.”

The End

Taking the RB Challenge

RB, a multinational consumer goods company, challenged students at the Sam M. Walton College of Business to think about the corporation’s product in totally new ways. While the challenge competition lasted only two days, the winning team continues to reap the benefits.

Last fall, Lindsey Wagaman, a junior at the University of Arkansas double-majoring in marketing and supply chain management, teamed up with fellow students — Sydney Brooks, a senior majoring in marketing, and Dylan Seelye, a senior majoring in finance — to accept the two-day RB business challenge: present a solution on how to increase market share of MegaRed Krill Oil, an omega-3 supplement.

On the first day, student teams reviewed sales and research on MegaRed, a Schiff Vitamin brand that is a subsidiary of RB, a multinational consumer goods company. RB executives coached teams and delivered feedback on presentation strategy and approach.

Wagaman, Brooks and Seelye gathered information, collaborated on ideas and developed a presentation.

“My team agreed that the majority of people who took krill oil pills were affluent middle-aged to elderly adults. We decided to position MegaRed products as a preventative measure for the whole family in order to expand the target market,” Wagaman said. “To do this, we proposed krill oil gummy vitamins for kids, biscuits and oil for dogs and subscription boxes. We highlighted different marketing aspects such as a heart mascot on the gummies and connections to popular nonprofit organizations like the American Heart Association.”

On the second day, student teams presented solutions to RB. While Wagaman, Brooks and Seelye’s team won the challenge, they received more than just bragging rights.

“Hands-on experience is one of the most valuable skills students can have. Having the opportunity to work on a real problem faced by a company helps students change their perspective and think about issues differently,” Wagaman said. “Many of the questions recruiters ask in interviews are about past experience in particular situations. Being able to draw on these experiences as answers to interview questions is a simple way to highlight hands-on experience and give students an upper hand when job hunting.”

Jordan Fry was the RB representative I gave my executive pitch to. As I was going through my involvement and experience he continually asked me why I do the things I do, and what I’m passionate about. I had never taken a step back to think about what I was really passionate about from a professional standpoint before. This question was asked throughout the two-day competition. Because of the push to connect the personal aspect to our professional careers, my group and I incorporated personal stories and experiences into our presentation.”

My group and I have remained in contact with RB representatives since the challenge,” Wagaman said. “We have been able to meet with them to further develop our solutions from the challenge and receive executive mentorship. I’m looking forward to maintaining my relationship with RB and continuing to work with them on our ideas.”

RB Challenge Benefits
“The most impactful part about RB’s Challenge to me was the amount of direct feedback each student received. On the first day of the challenge we each gave our executive pitches to an RB representative. Students received one-on-one feedback including tips for interviews and professional advice. Direct feedback is not something most employers or representatives give to students seeking internships or careers,” Wagaman said. “I would recommend all students apply for the spring RB Challenge because it’s a valuable opportunity that not many students get.”

Students have the opportunity to take the RB Challenge on Thursday, Feb. 7, by registering on Handshake no later than Thursday, Jan. 31. 

Find out more about the RB Challenge through the Career Development Services at theSam M. Walton College of Business by emailing Catherine Beasley, corporate programs manager, at cbeasley@walton.uark.edu.

About RB 
RB — the world’s leading consumer health and hygiene company — never tires of challenging the norm, and keeps giving people innovative solutions for healthier lives and happier homes. Visit RB.com for more information on RB’s career opportunities and graduate programs.​

IT Executive Forum for College Students To Be Held Nov. 1

The Information Technology Research Institute is hosting an IT Executive Forum for College Students on Thursday, Nov. 1, from 4-5 p.m. in the Donald W. Reynolds Center for Enterprise Development auditorium at the Sam M. Walton College of Business on the University of Arkansas campus.

Attendees will hear from information technology executives and may ask them questions about careers and the technology industry. The technology leaders represent Walmart, J.B. Hunt Transport Services Inc., Tyson Foods, Acxiom, FedEx and Movista. The panel will field questions from students. Intermittently, door prizes will be drawn for attendees.

For additional information, contact Eric Bradford, managing director of the Information Technology Research Institute, at ebradford@walton.uark.edu.

Diversity Is EPIC at Walton College

The Office of Diversity and Inclusion and Walton Career Services at the Sam M. Walton College of Business are hosting a picnic and networking event, panel discussion, recruiting information session and doughnut giveaway Oct. 8-11 to promote diversity in the workplace.

Students, faculty and staff are welcome to attend.

A Diversity in the Workplace discussion will take place in the Reynolds Center for Enterprise Development auditorium on Wednesday, Oct. 10, from 4-5 p.m. with senior leaders from Walmart, General Mills, Academy Sports + Outdoors and J.B. Hunt Transport Services, Inc. Panelists will discuss diversity and inclusion, thought processes and perceptions, and changes in mindset. Pre-registration is required.

Other activities include:

  • Picnic on the Plaza– Find free food and corporate recruiters Monday, Oct. 8, on Shollmier Plaza from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.Bring your resume and your appetite!
  • Women’s Leadership in Business Coffee Chat— Join a small group discussion about women’s leadership in the business world and career development on Tuesday, Oct. 9, 9:30-10:30 a.m., in WJWH 501. Space is limited. Pre-registration is required.
  • Pitched Perfect– Deliver an elevator pitch to corporate recruiters and get their feedback on Tuesday, Oct. 9, 3-5 p.m., in WJWH 203. Pre-registration is required.
  • Company of the Day: Academy Sports + Outdoors– Talk with corporate recruiters about career opportunities and diversity hiring on Wednesday, Oct. 10, in the WCOB second floor atrium 9 a.m.-noon and 1:30-3 p.m.  Info sessions will also be held in WJWH 203 starting at 12 p.m. and 1 p.m.
  • Diversity Doughnut Day– Grab a doughnut on Thursday, Oct. 11, from 8:30 a.m. until they are gone!
  • Pop-Up Shop on Global Intercultural Fluency– Join Walton career coaches on Thursday, Oct. 11, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., in the WJWH atrium for career advice on the go. Multicultural partners will share global engagement opportunities.

Visit Handshake to pre-register and learn more about each event.  For additional information, contact Catherine Beasley, manager for Corporate Programs at CBeasley@Walton.uark.edu or visit Walton Career Services online at walton.uark.edu/career.

Walton Career Services Hosts Student Events Throughout the Fall

Walton Career Services at the Sam M. Walton College of Business will host a variety of events this fall to help prepare students for career readiness through engagement with industry professionals, professional development skill enhancement and internship/job search strategy.
 
In addition to traditional career fairs, professional development sessions, informational sessions and interviews, this semester’s events will include weekly Are You Ready? pop-up shops, as well as its Company of the Day program. A summary of events is included below.
 
August Events:
 
  • Corporate Comes to Campus: Aug. 23, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
  • General Mills – Company of the Day: Aug. 29, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

September Events:

  • Walmart Career Fest: Sept. 5, 12 to 4 p.m.
  • Aldi Corporate Spotlight: Sept. 11-13
  • Walmart Networking Event: Sept. 12, 1 to 4 p.m.
  • Resume Rescue: Sept. 18 & 19, 9 to 11 a.m. and 1 to 3 p.m.
  • The Kraft Heinz Company – Company of the Day: Sept. 19, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • Leadership Walton Pre-Career Fair Networking Event: Sept. 24, 5 p.m.
  • Business Career Fair: Sept. 25, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1-3 p.m.
  • Are You Ready? Pop-Up Shop: Sept. 4, 11, 20 and 27, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

October Events:

  • WACO Title – Company of the Day: Oct. 3, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • Walmart Trivia Night: Oct. 3, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
  • Diversity is EPIC Week: Oct. 8-11
  • Pitched Perfect: Oct. 9, 3 to 5 p.m.
  • Academy Sports + Outdoors – Company of the Day: Oct. 10, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • Reckitt Benckiser Professional Outperformance Challenge: Oct. 24
  • Are You Ready? Pop-Up Shop: Every Tuesday, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

November Events:

  • CBIZ – Company of the Day: Nov. 7, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • Inceed – Company of the Day: Nov. 14, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • Are You Ready? Pop-Up Shop: Every Tuesday, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

For more details, visit walton.uark.edu/career/, email CareerServices@Walton.uark.edu or sign into Handshake at uark.joinhandshake.com to see the complete list and newly added events. You can also register to attend at uark.joinhandshake.com

Walton Welcomes Students to Campus with Block Party (and Free Food) Wednesday, August 22

The Sam M. Walton College of Business is hosting its annual Walton College Block Party on Wednesday, August 22, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the Linda Sue Shollmier Plaza to welcome students to campus. Free food will be served.

“I look forward to meeting our students at the Block Party every year,” said Dean Matthew A. Waller. “Students should join us between classes to grab lunch, meet faculty and staff and learn about the Walton resources and opportunities.”

Students will enjoy free drinks, hot dogs, pizza, chips and queso, along with music and informational booths set up in the plaza. Organizations and clubs available to Walton students will participate in the event.

The block party is made possible through the generosity of Con Quesos, Juice Palm, drink sponsor Pepsi Beverages Company and grilling sponsor First Security Bank.